thinking big: feminism, media, and pop culture

Posts Tagged ‘pinterest’

GLG Weekly Round-Up

In Weekly Round-Up on August 24, 2012 at 7:11 am

Check out “Our Voices, Our Stories: Training African Women’s & LGBT Organizations to Use Social Media is Critical” over at Spektra Speaks (and this one too).

And here is the Crunk Feminist Collective on the color of terrorism: “American breeds terrorists. And they are white not brown.”

Rebecca Solnit explores the type of man who thinks he knows everything, and who expects women to be the grateful recipients of his condescending lectures.

Natasha Vargas-Cooper writes about literary criticism that doubles as self-help in “Hard Blows.”

GLG pal Tammy Oler examines Pinterest’s visible girliness over at Bitch.

When women speak about their experiences with violence, many people don’t want to hear them. Lidia Yuknavitch’s powerful essay “Explicit Violence” demands recognition.

Ta-Nehisi Coates considers race and Obama’s presidency in “Fear of a Black President”

Michelle Dean writes about class, race, and TLC’s Here Comes Honey Boo Boo at Slate.

Defending Deschanel

In Uncategorized on March 9, 2012 at 1:18 pm

Sarah T.

Sometimes we don’t get to choose who we relate to.

As a nine-year-old tearing through The Babysitter’s Club series, I understood that Claudia and Stacey were objectively the coolest characters. (Claudia’s neon-green leotards worn under purple hammer pants! Stacey’s glamorous city slicker past!) But I couldn’t help but love Mary Anne Spier—a shy, big-hearted girl who loved animals and cried at the drop of a hat—the most. It was kind of embarrassing, but there was nothing I could do about it.

When I started getting into music from the 1960s in middle school, I understood that picking your favorite Beatle said a lot about you. A John person was smart and sensitive and revolutionary. A George enthusiast was mysterious and spiritual. Even a Ringo fan was fun-loving and unique. But I liked Paul best despite myself, knowing that it marked me as hopelessly cheerful, daffy lightweight.

Today, I find myself in a similarly uncool, wide-blue-eyed boat with Zooey Deschanel, the star of Fox’s The New Girl. Of course, plenty of people like Zooey—after all, she’s a sunny, funny, beautiful actress who has a hit sitcom on a major network. But she has a powerful band of detractors too. GLG’s own Melissa S. wrote a very eloquent, well-reasoned, non-attacky post on her problems with Deschanel’s character Jess in The New Girl. Many others make their points less diplomatically.

Deschanel critics tend to organize around several arguments. First, they claim, she is cloyingly twee. This is a problem not only because her critics are experiencing cute overload akin to The Berenstein Bears and Too Much Birthday, but because they see her adorkability as retrograde and unfeminist. Her girliness, they argue, places too much emphasis on singing and kittens and other childlike, harmless preoccupations, and not enough on adult, serious-minded matters.

While I understand these concerns about Deschanel, I can’t help but bristle at them. And a big part of that is because I know that I am in possession of many of the traits with which Deschanel-detractors take issue. Read the rest of this entry »